Light rain is in the forecast for the Bay Area starting Friday morning as a seasonably cool pattern persists, National Weather Service officials said Thursday. Rain will start first over the North Bay late Friday morning or early afternoon before moving from north to south throughout the Bay Area in the afternoon and evening, weather officials said.

Accumulations will be light. The highest amounts are forecast for the immediate coastline and in the higher elevations of the North Bay mountains. 

Rain will dissipate regionwide by Saturday and temperatures will gradually rise into early next week, according to weather officials.

Rain may return by midweek, but a great deal of uncertainty exists around that prediction, forecasters said.

San Francisco public works officials are reminding the city’s residents and business owners to sweep up litter and leaves to keep them from plugging storm drains, also known as catch basins.

“That simple act can help protect homes and businesses from localized flooding,” said acting public works director Alaric Degrafinried in a statement.

Public works crews will be clearing storm drains ahead of the expected rain. The department is also providing up to 10 free sandbags to help city residents protect themselves from flooding.

Sandbags are primarily to protect properties prone to flooding. Sandbags can be picked up from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday through Saturday at the Marin Street/Kansas Street gate of the Public Works operations yard.

San Francisco residents must bring proof that they live in the city to get sandbags, public works officials said. Face coverings must be worn when in the operations yard to help protect against COVID-19. 

San Francisco residents are asked to call 311 to report any flooding, downed power lines, plugged storm drains and hanging tree limbs.

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By Richard Moran

Richard Moran loves to write about sports with the Golden State Online. Before that, he worked as a senior writer at ESPN. Richard grew up in San Diego and graduated from the University of San Diego in 2004, after which he worked as an editor for five years.

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