san-jose-sharks-say-downtown-projects-may-force-sap-center-exit

SAN JOSE — The San Jose Sharks on Thursday raised concerns about being forced out of the SAP Center in the city’s downtown because of plans for massive development projects near the sports complex and Diridon train station.

The hockey team, in an open letter to fans and supporters on Thursday, said it has become increasingly alarmed that the proposals for the development of an array of projects on the western edges of downtown San Jose could imperil the future of the Sharks in the Bay Area’s largest city.

“For more than a year, we have been sharing our concerns with you regarding the proposed, massive development projects within the Diridon area of downtown San Jose, which surrounds SAP Center,” the Sharks said in the letter. “For the past several years, we have been sharing those same concerns with city of San Jose officials and Google.”

The warning from the Sharks could force city officials onto a tightrope as they attempt to balance the needs of the city’s only major sports team and the municipality’s quest to dramatically revitalize the city’s small downtown district.

Google plans a transit-oriented development of office buildings, homes, shops, restaurants, entertainment hubs, cultural centers, and parks near the Diridon Station and the SAP complex.

Plus, additional development on a large scale is envisioned by the city of San Jose and developers in the downtown areas adjacent to the proposed Google village.

The Sharks expressed dismay with the current results of the talks involving the hockey team and city officials.

“Unfortunately, those discussions have yielded limited results and the planners of these projects appear intent on moving forward in a manner that could force the Sharks out of San Jose,” the Sharks stated in the letter.

 

 

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By Richard Moran

Richard Moran loves to write about sports with the Golden State Online. Before that, he worked as a senior writer at ESPN. Richard grew up in San Diego and graduated from the University of San Diego in 2004, after which he worked as an editor for five years.

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